The Agreement That Ended the Spanish-American War of 1898 Was Treaty of Paris

The Treaty of Paris of 1898 marked the official end of the Spanish-American War, which took place between April and August of that year. The agreement was signed on December 10, 1898, by representatives of the United States and Spain in Paris, France. This treaty marked the end of Spain`s colonial empire and marked the beginning of the United States` emergence as a global superpower.

The war began with the United States` intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. After the sinking of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor, which the U.S. blamed on Spain, the U.S. declared war on Spain. It was a short and decisive battle, with the U.S. emerging as the victor in just four months.

Under the terms of the Treaty of Paris, Spain ceded control of the Philippines, Guam, and Puerto Rico to the United States. The U.S. paid Spain $20 million for the Philippines, which was then a Spanish colony. The treaty also recognized Cuba`s independence and granted the United States the right to occupy Cuba until a stable government could be established.

The signing of the Treaty of Paris marked the beginning of a new era for the United States and its role in global affairs. The acquisition of Puerto Rico, Guam, and the Philippines marked the country`s emergence as a global power. The United States` acquisition of these territories also marked the beginning of a long period of debate over the country`s role in the world and its responsibility to its new territories.

In conclusion, the Treaty of Paris of 1898 was a significant agreement that marked the end of the Spanish-American War and the beginning of the United States` emergence as a global power. The treaty`s terms laid the foundation for the country`s territorial expansion and its role in global affairs. Today, the treaty remains an important moment in American history and an important event in the history of the Spanish Empire.